Comparative Environmental Health Assessments:A Brief Introduction and Application in China

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Doc #: 41 Title: Comparative Environmental Health Assessments:A Brief Introduction and Application in China | Document LinkProperty "DocURL" (as page type) with input value "http://ehs.sph.berkeley.edu/krsmith/presentations/NYAS%20China%2008.pdf" contains invalid characters or is incomplete and therefore can cause unexpected results during a query or annotation process.
Organization/Author: Kirk R. Smith University of California,School of Public Health, Berkeley, California, USA
Type: Report
Year: 2008
Region: East Asia
Observation Type: {{{ObservationType}}}Property "Property:ObservationType" (as page type) with input value "{{{ObservationType}}}" contains invalid characters or is incomplete and therefore can cause unexpected results during a query or annotation process.
Observation Needs: {{{ObservationNeedType}}}Property "Property:ObservationNeedType" (as page type) with input value "{{{ObservationNeedType}}}" contains invalid characters or is incomplete and therefore can cause unexpected results during a query or annotation process.
Document Status: Submitted, 2009/07/01
Parameters: NEEDS EQ (Environmental Quality)


Description of Document: Environmental QualityIt is well recognized that environmental risk factors are important determinants of human health. The basic indicators of progress in the two arenas are not equivalent and in some cases not highly correlated. EQ relies on ambient and widespread measures, such as outdoor air pollution, forest destruction, and river contamination, but environmental health relies on measures of human exposure, which are often heavily influenced by local factors that do not significantly affect EQ, such as the proximity of people to the pollution source.Property "Description" (as page type) with input value "Environmental QualityIt is well recognized that environmental risk factors are important determinants of human health. The basic indicators of progress in the two arenas are not equivalent and in some cases not highly correlated. EQ relies on ambient and widespread measures, such as outdoor air pollution, forest destruction, and river contamination, but environmental health relies on measures of human exposure, which are often heavily influenced by local factors that do not significantly affect EQ, such as the proximity of people to the pollution source." contains invalid characters or is incomplete and therefore can cause unexpected results during a query or annotation process.